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THE OBERLIN EVANGELIST 1843 paragraph 101 74 Lecture II. Nature of True Virtue ...

11. God's love to us must be benevolence. It could not be complacency, for instead of feeling complacent towards sinners, He must abhor their character. It was benevolence then which made the Atonement, and all the provisions of salvation.

 

 


THE OBERLIN EVANGELIST 1845 paragraph 780 748 Lecture XVI. Faith in its Relations to the Love of God ...

Hence, a realization of God's love to us is essential to real trust. First, you must see your sins--and then to prevent despair, and to save you from being repelled by your own conscious guilt from the presence of God, you must apprehend his infinite love. Seeing this, the soul cries out--"after all my guilt and ill-desert, God does love me. Yes, so much has he loved me, as to give his Son to die for me. Now, I see that I may come back at once to my own Father."

 

 


THE OBERLIN EVANGELIST 1858 paragraph 12 TABLE OF CONTENTS ...

Lecture VII. God's Love To Us

 

 


THE OBERLIN EVANGELIST 1858 paragraph 247 246 Lecture VII. God's Love To Us ...

God's Love To Us
Lecture VII
July 21, 1858

 

 


THE OBERLIN EVANGELIST 1858 paragraph 265 246 Lecture VII. God's Love To Us ...

1. We see that saving faith must be the heart's belief of this great fact that God so loved us. Saving faith receives the death of Christ as an expression of God's love to us. No other sort of faith -- no faith in anything else, wins our heart to love God. Saving faith saves us from our bondage and our prejudice against Him. It is this which makes it saving. Any faith that leaves out this great truth must fail to save us. If any one element of faith is vital, it is this. Let any man doubt this fact of God's love in Christ, and I would not give much for all his religion. It is worthless.

 

 


SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY (1851), APPENDIX Reply to "Princeton Biblical Repertory" paragraph 221

     God's love to us must be benevolence, and his love to the universe must be benevolence. Complacency in holiness, I have shown, may consist either in an emotion of delight in it, or in a modification of benevolence or good will. God loves all beings with good will, and towards holy beings he exercises complacency, both in the form of benevolence, and in the form of an emotion of delight in them. But it seems, the this writer considers approbation as a higher form of virtue than benevolence. But what is approbation? Why, it is a necessary state of the intellect in view of moral excellence. No moral agent can otherwise than approve of virtue or of moral excellence. This is as true of the worst as of the best of men. Who does not know, that from a law of the intellect, a moral agent, whether holy or sinful, must and does of necessity approve of moral excellence. But this it seems we are to regard as a higher form of virtue than that which we approbate in God. God is benevolent, and we are, from the laws of our being; necessitated to approve of it; but in this involuntary state we are more virtuous, or exercise a higher order of virtue, than the benevolence which we behold in God, and approve.

 

 


GOSPEL THEMES, SERMON 18 - God's Love Commended To Us paragraph 16

1. We see that saving faith must be the heart's belief of this great fact that God so loved us. Saving faith receives the death of Christ as an expression of God's love to us. No other sort of faith -- no faith in anything else -- wins our heart to love God. Saving faith saves us from our bondage and our prejudice against Him. It is this which makes it saving. Any faith that leaves out this great truth must fail to save us. If any one element of faith is vital, it is this. Let any man doubt this fact of God's love in Christ, and I would not give much for all his religion. It is worthless.